Book Review: The Sunday Girl.

A review of: The Sunday Girl – By Pip Drysdale.

Source: https://www.booktopia.com.au/the-sunday-girl-pip-drysdale/book/9781760851743.html?source=pla&gclid=CjwKCAjwgbLzBRBsEiwAXVIygCSCjAc-SeKZXMCPTw4-QMBT9gLNFsdWBcwXc7kZKuGZ0zNR48wlHxoCE_MQAvD_BwE

TITLE:
The Sunday Girl

AUTHOR:
Pip Drysdale

GENRE:
Thriller

PUBLISHED:
2018

PAGES:
336

GET IT HERE:
booktopia.com.au

Overview:

Taylor and Angus serve two parts of a whole lot of drama. They have a volatile relationship. And when they break up, it gets ugly.

For Taylor, getting dumped is one thing. Having your ex-boyfriend post an explicit video of you on to a porn site is something entirely different. And now she is out for revenge.

But what starts out as a plan for some kind of petty vengeance, soon turns into something more twisted. Taylor soon realises the person she loved is not who she fell in love with.

With Taylor’s plan for revenge spiraling out of control, she soon realises it’s not just a petty game anymore.

My Thoughts:

Drysdale’s novel, ‘The Sunday Girl’ is narrated in the first person by the main character, Taylor. This is much the same as Drysdale’s second novel, ‘The Strangers We Know’. And in much the same fashion, the reader sees things from Taylor’s perspective and gets a first-person account of Taylor’s thoughts and feelings.

As I’ve said before, I’m not a huge fan of first-person perspective, but I did find ‘The Sunday Girl’ to be written better than ‘The Strangers We Know’. ‘The Sunday Girl’ was far easier to relate to, and the feelings the narrator felt, I began feeling too.

This novel had some interesting twists, and although neither party (Taylor or Angus) was completely in the right when it came to their actions, the ambiguity was realistic.

Overall, I enjoyed the book and the modern storyline.

My Rating: 3/5

Book Review: The Strangers We Know.

A review of: The Strangers We Know – By Pip Drysdale.

Source: https://www.simonandschuster.com.au/books/The-Strangers-We-Know/Pip-Drysdale/9781925685848

TITLE:

The Strangers We Know

AUTHOR:

Pip Drysdale

GENRE:

Thriller/ Mystery

PUBLISHED:

2019

PAGES:

336

GET IT HERE:

amazon.com.au

Overview:

Charlie’s life gets turned upside down when she discovers her husband, Oliver, on a dating app on a girl’s night out. Unwilling to believe her husband could be unfaithful, Charlie digs deeper, becoming suspicious of his friends, his work and his overseas trips.

But the deeper Charlie digs, the more danger she puts herself in. In a search for the truth, she finds far more than she was bargaining for.

My Thoughts:

Pip Drysdale’s novel, ‘The Strangers We Know’ is narrated in the first person, as Charlie. I find that writing in the first person can be slightly risky, as the story can become jumbled.

Drysdale does do an alright job writing in the first person, although I found the plot line jumps a little bit, as sometimes you’re in the moment, and then ‘Charlie’ will say things like:

And that should have been it: rock bottom. A cheating husband and broken dreams. Fair is fair. But no. Life was just getting warmed up.’

For me, it created an air of disorientation, and broke the suspense I was feeling beforehand.

Regardless, the plot itself was quite dramatic and had many twists and turns, which would keep any reader on their toes, no matter the perspective or tense. Everyone is a suspect, and no one is immune to Charlie’s scrutiny.

I can’t say much more without giving away all of the juicy details, so I’ll leave it at that.

My Rating: 3/5

Quote Of The Day 05/02/2020

WEDNESDAY, 05/02/2020:

Source: https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/620582023632589178/

‘You read and write and sing and experience, thinking that one day these things will build the character you admire to live as.

You love and lose and bleed best you can, to the extreme, hoping that one day the world will read you like the poem you want to be.’

– Charlotte Eriksson

Quote Of The Day 17/01/2020

FRIDAY, 17/01/2020:

Source: https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/563442603352792277/

‘To acquire the habit of reading is to construct for yourself a refuge from almost all the miseries of life.’

– W. Somerset Maugham

Book Review: The Silent Patient.

A review of: The Silent Patient – By Alex Michaelides.

Source: https://www.hachette.com.au/alex-michaelides/the-silent-patient

TITLE:

The Silent Patient

AUTHOR:

Alex Michaelides

GENRE:

Thriller/ Mystery

PUBLISHED:

2019

PAGES:

336

GET IT HERE:

Kmart.com

Overview:

Alicia Berenson won’t say a word – not since she shot dead her husband, Gabriel.

Once a famous painter, now turned notorious, Alicia now resides at ‘The Grove’ – a psychiatric ward. Refusing to speak for over 6 years, when she shot her husband point blank 5 times in the face, Alicia suddenly becomes aware of a new Doctor in the ward.

Psychotherapist Theo, has recently switched jobs – intrigued by Alicia’s case, and desperate to unravel the mystery behind the silent patient at ‘The Grove’.

My Thoughts:

‘The Silent Patient’ by Alex Michaelides is gripping, from start to finish. Alicia Berenson is an extremely interesting character, providing thought-provoking moments, even in the absence of her voice.

This novel has many twists and turns, partly written from Theo’s point of view, and partly from Alicia’s, in the form of her personal diary entries. There are so many questions, all culminating into a final up-ending.

Without giving away too much, all that can be said is that as the reader, it was easy to become drawn in, invested and intensely mystified – and subsequently de-mystified – all in the space of a few hundred pages.

My only criticism is that ‘The Silent Patient’ ends as quickly as it started, and although that is partly intentional, it left me wanting more – more information, more backstory and more pages.

My Rating: 4/5

Book Review: Suitcase of Dreams.

A review of: Suitcase Of Dreams – By Tania Blanchard.

Source: https://www.simonandschuster.com.au/books/Suitcase-of-Dreams/Tania-Blanchard/9781760851675

TITLE:

Suitcase of Dreams

AUTHOR:

Tania Blanchard

GENRE:

Historical Fiction

PUBLISHED:

2018

PAGES:

448

GET IT HERE:

Simon & Schuster

Overview:

Suitcase of Dreams, by Tania Blanchard, is the sequel to ‘The Girl From Munich‘. Picking up where the last book left off, the main character, Lotte, arrives in Sydney Australia, after the war in Germany.

Lotte and her family are desperate for a new beginning in Australia, hearing promises of abundant work and opportunities in the new and vibrant country. But Lotte and her husband Erich soon find Australian life to be much harder to settle in to.

Erich’s engineering qualifications aren’t recognised, the migrant working conditions are dismal and the attitude of some Australians toward them and others put a different spin on the life they were sold.

Erich and Lotte find they have to work doubly hard to provide a safe and secure place for their two daughters in this strange, new country. Slowly but surely, the two of them begin to find their place in Australian life – Erich building a business in carpentry, while Lotte pursues her photography career.

But will the family’s challenges and misfortunes build them up, or break them down?

My Thoughts:

This sequel follows the struggles of Lotte and her family now that they are in Australia. The author, Tania Blanchard, provides an incredibly moving insight into how life was for migrants after the war – many promised lives that never came to fruition.

Much like the first novel, Blanchard gives a strikingly raw story of love, loss and sacrifice, reminding the reader of the not-so-distant past. Touching on not only Nazi-Occupied Germany, but the Vietnam War and migrant conditions, she captures the true essence of their struggles, but more importantly, how Australia became somewhere so many could call home.

Whether you’ve read the first installment or not (which I would highly recommend), this novel is beautifully written and worth reading.

My Rating: 4/5

Book Review: Firestarter.

A review of: Firestarter – By Stephen King.

Source: https://www.stephenking.com/library/novel/firestarter.html

TITLE:

Firestarter

AUTHOR:

Stephen King

GENRE:

Horror, Fiction, Thriller

PUBLISHED:

1981

PAGES:

416

GET IT HERE:

amazon.com

Overview:

Charlie McGee is no ordinary child.

But when you haven’t got ordinary parents, it’s only to be expected.

Charlie’s parents (Andy and Vicky) took part in a Government-run college experiment in the 60’s, when scientists were trying to find a link between psychedelic drugs and psychic abilities. Their experience was something they tried to brush off, but strange things begin to happen to them.

Andy and Vicky try to live a normal life, in a normal neighbourhood, eventually having a child – Charlie. But Charlie is not normal. At an early age, Charlie shows signs of extraordinary talent – drawing power from seemingly thin air.

But the Government isn’t done experimenting yet. ‘The Shop’ – a firm of secret Government agents – is determined to detain Charlie and her father, and continue studying Charlie and her father’s abilities.

Andy and Charlie go on the run, trying to evade and expose The Shop, in order to live out their lives in peace. But keeping one step ahead of The Shop is harder than they first thought…

My Thoughts:

This was the first Stephen King novel I have read – so I went into it with an open mind. Usually I steer clear of Sci-Fi and stick to historical fiction and story-lines based on facts, so this was a little out of my comfort zone.

That aside, the story was great to follow – filled with suspense and anticipation for what was going to happen next. The role of Andy being a father who simply wanted to make sure his daughter had a normal life is very relatable and also quite heartfelt at times.

Although the ending left me with some unanswered questions, I felt like that was all part of the intrigue of this sort of genre, and still thoroughly enjoyed the book.

My Rating: 4/5

Editor’s Note: OCTOBER.

Better late than never, they say…

Better late than never, they say…

What a roller-coaster of a month October has been! Thank you all for being so patient with me – I know I usually write my ‘Editor’s Notes’ at the start of the month, rather than at the end.

I decided early last month that I would go on a ‘mini hiatus’ in October, preempting how busy I would be, and I’m so glad that I did.

I used to feel guilty for taking time out for myself, but nowadays I realize just how important it is.

Person Wearing Watch Near the Newspaper

On top of the usual shenanigans, I’ve been settling in to my new job (that I love), helping my brother move house, packing and moving my house (I don’t think it’s possible to move a teenager, a partner and two sausage dogs without having at least 5 mental breakdowns) and catching up with family and friends I haven’t seen in a while.

I guess you could say I’ve been kind of busy – and usually I would still juggle all of that and post daily on ‘The Art of Overthinking’ but this month, I opted to take a step back and use the time I would normally spend on my blog, on some self-care.

White Textile Beside Lit Candle

Rest, Rest, Rest.

Self-care, for me, is spending time by myself. That may seem counter-intuitive for some of my more extroverted friends, but for me, alone time is a time for me to reset and re-evaluate where I’m at.

Solitude is where I place my chaos to rest and awaken my inner peace.

Nikki Rowe

Since starting my job as a Youth Support Worker, self-care has become even more important. As far as I’m concerned, if I’m not in the right head-space, how can I properly look after vulnerable young people?

The answer is simple: I can’t.

So with everything going on this month, I decided to spend some time soul-searching, going back to basics and deciding what my values looked like.

Stop, Pause, Reflect.

During my ‘break’ from blogging, I decided not to check my daily ‘stats’, stopped checking my Pinterest followers and kept my phone on silent.

I spent time with my dear Grannie, who turned 98 this year and still lives independently – it’s amazing how many stories someone has when they’ve been alive since 1921(!).

I went and saw an old friend from Law School, Robyn – one of the strongest, most resilient and passionate people I know. When we were in Law School, Robyn shared with me her reason for studying – to get someone out of prison who shouldn’t be there: Derek Bromley. Derek has been incarcerated for 35 years for a crime he did not commit.

I’ve met Derek multiple times now, and thoroughly believe in his innocence, as well as the amazing work Robyn has done to make Derek’s case known.

Scenic Photo Of Beach During Dawn

Derek’s legal team is currently preparing for the High Court. If you’d like to learn more about Derek’s case, or Miscarriages of Justice in general, I’d implore you to check out Dr. Bob Moles’ website: Networked Knowledge or Google ‘Derek Bromley’.

Oh, Brother!

This time off has also given me extra time to spend with my 5 siblings, including this little cherub, who has just gone 5 months(!).

I love these little people; and it is not a slight thing when they, who are so fresh from God, love us.

Charles Dickens

It’s such a blessing to have so many beautiful humans in my life – especially all my younger siblings, who make my life feel far more important. It’s an amazing feeling to love and be loved.

I’m back, baby!

Thank you all again, for being so patient while I’ve been missing in action.

But now it’s time to start writing again, and hopefully get back to everyone who has messaged, emailed and tried to contact me!

You’ll be hearing from me very soon, I’m sure – with Christmas, New Years’ and all those fun things just around the corner – there’s plenty to talk about!

Enjoy the rest of your October (oh, and a Happy Halloween to my American friends!), look after yourselves – until next time! Xx

Four Sunflowers in Bloom on Teal Surface

Hopeless Musing #30

Light.

 

Source: https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/474918723206764986/

LIGHT.

Some people turn our hearts to fire, and others turn them to ice.

But it doesn’t matter how long it’s been since I saw you last, your presence is like light. As soon as I see you, my problems melt away, burned by a fire that could never die.

There aren’t enough good words in the English language to describe how much I care about you.

But every day you walk this Earth, means I continue to walk it too.

Book Review: The Woman In The Window.

A review of: The Woman In The Window – By A. J. Finn.

Source: https://www.amazon.in/Woman-Window-J-Finn/dp/0008294372

TITLE:

The Woman In The Window

AUTHOR:

A. J. Finn

GENRE:

Mystery/ Thriller

PUBLISHED:

2018

PAGES:

449

GET IT HERE:

amazon.com.au

Overview:

‘The Woman In The Window’, by A. J. Finn tells the story of Anna Fox, a reclusive ex-psychologist who is afraid to leave her up-town, New York home. Diagnosed with Agoraphobia, Anna spends her days drinking wine and spying on her neighbours.

Anna’s only glimpse of the outside world is through her windows, where she keeps track of her neighbours movements. When the Russells family move in across the street, Anna becomes excited – but as she spirals into her depression and medicated delusions, she begins to question the strange things she sees from her upstairs-window.

With no-one to turn to, let alone believe her, Anna begins to investigate further.

My Thoughts:

‘The Woman In The Window’ is fast-paced and dripping with mystery from the get-go. The novel gives the reader a glimpse into the sufferings of someone so afraid of the outside world, they cannot leave their own home.

Anna is grasping at reality most of the time, struggling with loneliness, medicated sleep and a drinking habit she relies on to pass the time. The reader must decide if Anna is reliable and her account of the happenings in her street truly happened. Was she hallucinating? Dreaming? Drunk? Panic-stricken?

There are moments where the story takes dramatic turns, and the reader falls easily into the whirlwind of Anna’s confusion, fear and frustration, making the novel a true page-turner.

It is definitely worth the read, if you’re into fast-paced and page-turning, with a small dose of cliche to go along with it.

My Rating: 3.5/5